• Holiday Open Haus

Holiday Open Haus

  • 04 Dec 2016
  • 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
  • GAI
Holiday Open Haus

Saturday, December 3 - 11am-5pm
Sunday, December 4 - 11am-3pm
Free and open to the public



As the weather turns cold, the GAI opens its doors once again for our Holiday Open Haus! Enjoy the feel of a European market with all the comforts of our community home. Continuing as a two-day event, we will feature local vendors selling German Christmas gift items, model trains, festive food and drink featuring Glühwein, Lebkuchen, and more! Come on Saturday for shopping and afternoon Christmas Trivia in the Ratskeller—where you could win an extra gift for a friend with your knowledge of Christmas traditions in Germany—or bring the Kinder on Sunday to visit with St. Nikolaus and make your own authentic tree ornament.

On the Menu:

-Split Pea Soup

-Chicken Wild Rice Soup

-Brats on a Bun

-Flammkuchen (Grilled flat breads)

-German Sweets Treat bag

-Pretzels

-Strudel with Vanilla Sauce

-Hot Apple Cider

-Glühwein (hot mulled wine)

In the Haus:

- Aki's Bread Haus

- Ambertree Jewelry

- Evelyn Bunzlauer Polish Pottery

- German Specialty Imports

- Northern Traders

- Summit Hill Preserves (Saturday Only)

Plus!

- Lebkuchen (Gingerbread) by the Deutscher Damenklub

- Modelleisenbahn (German Model Trains)

- German Holiday Trivia (Saturday Only)

- Christmas Ornaments - make your own 

- Visit St.Nikolaus (Sunday only)

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

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